Art Exhibits

31 JAN 2014

Haiti: Sèvis Lwa

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Haitian Vodou flags, or dwapo, are powerful liturgical objects whose unique beauty has captured the attention of art collectors and tourists to Haiti in recent decades. Scholars believe that the importance of flags in Vodou religious ceremonies traces back to beadwork practices of the Yoruba people of West Africa and the Asafor military flags of Fante people in Ghana. Among the most sacred and expensive ritual items, most temples keep two flags housed in the inner sanctuary, which represent both

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17 SEP 2013

Revolution Graffiti: Street Art of Egypt

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The 25 January revolution in Egypt opened the flood-gates for a wave of street art. Decades of oppression and despair suddenly were turned into optimism, a new-born vitality and energy, allowing people to explore new freedoms – including the right to make art freely. The Swedish photographer Mia Gröndahl has documented and followed the graffiti movement in Egypt from its beginning in January 2011.

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15 JAN 2013

Activism and Protest

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Among the most valuable images the Herald Sun’s photographers have captured are images of the civil right struggle, images which can help to keep the memory of that struggle alive as those who lived it grow older and pass from the scene.

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27 AUG 2012

ZALMAÏ: Walking in Quicksand

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Ten years after the fall of the Taliban and the intervention of the international community in Afghanistan, Afghans continue to be the most exiled people in the world. In 2010, three out of ten refugees in the world were originating from Afghanistan. Disillusioned and dispirited from a peace that never comes, Afghans are on exile’s road again.

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20 APR 2012

Literacy Through Photography: Tanzania

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Literacy Through Photography (LTP) is a program of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. In summer 2008, LTP staff members traveled with eight Duke students in the DukeEngage program to Arusha, Tanzania.

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7 FEB 2012

Bruce Davenport Jr. – All I Need Is 1 Pen

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On view at the Franklin Center Gallery will be the exhibition All I Need Is 1 Pen, a show comprised of works on paper by Bruce Davenport Jr. as well as a short video from the upcoming Richard Barber film The Whole Gritty City, which documents both the marching band culture of New Orleans and Davenport Jr.’s artistic work in response to that culture. Davenport Jr.’s work is on the cusp between folk art and contemporary art and seems to

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7 FEB 2012

Sugar Cane (2003-2007)

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This exhibit by South African artist Zwelethu Mthethwa is a modest but able reminder of the genius of Mthethwa’s work, represented here by seven seminal photo works from his 2003-2007 Sugar Cane series. These works recall a moment when the artist came to grips with a critical question in contemporary photography: how to provide greater dignity and realism to his subjects than that afforded by the black-and-white documentary reportage as was prevalent during South Africa’s historical transformation from apartheid to

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13 JAN 2010

SeeSaw Design Studio: I AM the Dream

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“I AM the Dream” is a mixed media installation created by students of Durham’s SeeSaw Design Studio that examines what ‘The Dream’ means to them. The ideation process began with a historical discussion of Martin Luther King Jr. (with an eye towards the future) followed by the development of a personal written statement. Next, imagery was conceived, produced, manipuated via computer, and finally printed in-house. SeeSaw Design Studio is a non-profit free after-school enrichment program that provides teens with design-focused

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17 SEP 2009

Jean Toche: Impressions from the Rogue Bush Imperial Presidency

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Professor Kristine Stiles, Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies, curated the exhibition from her extensive archive of art, artists’ letters, documents, posters, and ephemera. A 48-page full color catalog designed by Molly Renda featuring an essay by Professor Stiles accompanies the exhibition. In her essay, Stiles writes that, “for over fifty years, Jean Toche has made art from the position of moral and ethical indignation, expressed openly and without reservation against political corruption, social hypocrisy, and human rights

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16 APR 2009

The Sea is History – Moun Kantè, Yoleros, Balseros, Boteros

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In popular perception, the southern border of the United States runs eastward below San Diego ending around Brownsville, Texas. If the border extends through the Gulf and off the Florida peninsula, it is only vaguely recognized. The series “The Sea is History – Moun Kantè, Yoleros, Balseros, Boteros” brings that boundary into sharper focus by interrogating the context in which Caribbean sea farers negotiate their subjectivity. By setting out in fragile boats, intent on reaching the United States or its

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